In Defence of Writing in Books

So this is pretty pretty controversial, but I thought in the spirit of talking about deadly sins, I thought it was time I discussed one of my bookish habits… And that is writing in books!

shrek torch and pitchfork.png

Now I know that just mentioning it will be enough to get many people running for the torches and pitchforks, but I do have my reasons for this. I rarely do the whole *oh look I got a humanities degree* thing unless I’m looking for laughs, but in all seriousness, this is standard practice for students and academics in this field. For purely practical reasons, writing in books not only helps with selecting poignant quotes, but is the most effective way of dissecting language. To give an example, here is my copy of Dorian Gray:

IMG_20170425_172302578

I didn’t just highlight it for kicks or because *pretty colours*- I actually did that to expose the layers of meaning across the text, particularly in this incidence colour coding specific symbolism and techniques Wilde used. While I have actually poked fun at this before in my Goodnight Moon post, I can also tell you that this is an accurate look at how a poem that’s been properly analysed will end up looking. For me and many others, writing in books is device to encourage thinking.

goodnight-moon

Even though I keep a ton of notebooks to hand, it’s not sufficient for all the ways a book needs to be taken apart and there are downsides for doing a proper thorough analysis just using one technique– time wasting if nothing else is a huge issue with writing out all the quotes- a lot of books need both to do it justice.

dscn3888

And while I wouldn’t personally write in a library book, I’ve found other people underlining passages in non-fiction helpful and add to the debate/discussion the book is having. I don’t know about you, but I’m a “work as close to the deadline as is humanly possible” kind of gal, so if at uni I picked up an annotated non-fic book where some kindly soul had drawn arrows literal to the important bits, I’d be singing Hallelujahs all the way home. As for writing in books I borrow from friends- well, I’m not an *animal*! (Just a cheeky monkey- but I still wouldn’t dream of doing that!)

Other people also say writing in books is a way of making a book more personal too- which is fair- because, even though I only annotate classics, would-be classics or non-fiction, I do feel like people reading my books are getting a bit of a more personal experience (or just getting walloped over the head with *foreshadowing* signposts as my sister complained to me once). Whatever way you personalise your books, there is something to be said about picking up a used book and finding someone else’s impressions in it (it’s a weird quirk I have, but I even love stranger’s inscriptions in the front of used books).

One last complaint I have seen is “what would the author think!” Well the obvious answer is “I have no idea” but then nor does the defender of clean copies. Some writers might be offended, sure, but I can only live my life as a “do as you would be done by” sort of person. And I can safely say for myself, as a writer, that if someone annotated my work I would be over the moon. Because it would be saying “look how many thoughts I had because of what you wrote!” I cannot imagine anything more flattering.

So- dare I ask- do you agree or disagree? What is your opinion on writing in books? And should I expect an angry mob outside my home tonight for being a *tad* too controversial? Let me know in the comments (so I can barricade my front door!!)

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124 thoughts on “In Defence of Writing in Books

  1. daleydowning says:

    Ha! I love the warning for torches and pitchforks! Honestly, I don’t write in books, and I don’t like to get used copies of non-fic/textbooks in case they are written in. It’s because I don’t want what someone else thought to distract me from what *I* think of the text/thoughts. Am I a Nazi, about to show up outside your door with aforementioned weapons? No. Did I cringe a little reading this post? Yes. 🙂 But for me, it’s about respect of the printed word. (Note to anyone who might be reading my novels: PLEASE DO NOT WRITE IN THEM, I MAY INDEED CRY. Or at least DON’T ADMIT to it.) 😉 The only time I break the rule about not writing in is when it’s my own manuscript and I’m editing.

    Liked by 3 people

    • theorangutanlibrarian says:

      Haha glad you liked that, even if the post overall made you cringe 😉 That’s fair enough- I personally like it, but to each their own. I also wouldn’t be donating books I’ve written in because once I’ve done that I’ve pretty much marked them as *mine* (gonna get all gollum-like and possessive if someone tried to part me from them at that stage
      😉 )- but that’s just me- so I can understand why you’d avoid it. I don’t think it shows a lack of respect- personally I think if anything it’s reverential- but we can agree to disagree on that 😉 haha and I can tell you, as well, that your book is safe with me- I only write in the genres I listed above 😉 All my YA, fantasy, childrens books etc are clean. Haha yep- everyone has to do that- though I prefer to do it in red on track changes cos it looks so dramatic 😉

      Liked by 1 person

      • daleydowning says:

        I certainly wouldn’t try to resell a textbook if I’d written in it! But that’s a major part of why I don’t write in books, anyway – what if I change my mind and want to get rid of them at some point?

        Liked by 1 person

        • theorangutanlibrarian says:

          Ahh I agree with you there- I wouldn’t want to resell it either and I definitely don’t if that’s the case. If I’m in doubt about passing it on, I just don’t write in it. But I can usually tell pretty quickly if it’s worth keeping (aka if it’s worth writing in in the first place 😉 )

          Liked by 1 person

  2. Nel says:

    I probably would have pulled out the pitchfork if you hadn’t explained it in such great detail. Plus, you’re writing in used books not like first editions. That would definitely be angry mob worthy. I don’t think authors would care either way. Majority of authors I follow say the best thing you can do for them is to leave a review of their work. Your method of cranking out a critique or review is irrelevant to them (my opinion anyway). I’m not an author though so what do I know? hahaha

    Liked by 3 people

    • theorangutanlibrarian says:

      haha well I’m glad you resisted the urge 😉 Oh gosh no- I would never write in a special edition- let alone a collectable first edition!! I should probably add I have respect for antiques and lovely things in general- that would be like carving my name into a 300 year old table- just so wrong! Anyway, I kind of meant more in academic spheres- while I know no author is interested in my essays, I can tell you that once those essays turn into articles and books (by professional academics, not little old me), plenty of authors (mostly dead ones) wouldn’t find that kind of analysis irrelevant. I’m going to sound all “Roland Barthes- Death of the Author” here, but critical readers are what gives authors of classics their immortality. But yes, with modern authors, whose main goal is to get sales, they’d probably just like a juicy review praising their work. However even then, that would require some analysis- and then we’ll come full circle in terms of “how do you critique something effectively?” 😉 Hope that makes sense 😉

      Liked by 2 people

      • Nel says:

        I understand what you’re saying. When I said irrelevant, I meant the actual writing in a book part. I think even if you handed a modern author a copy of their book with your notes all over it with a corresponding paper they would treasure it. 😁 And you’re right. Everything foes come full circle.

        Liked by 3 people

  3. Joelendil says:

    I write in some of my own books; mostly the theology/philosophy ones (questions, agreement, disagreement, good quotes, etc.), and my Tolkien ones (my Silmarillion especially is color coded by family/race and cross-indexed to various other of his works). However, I strongly dislike reading books with someone else’s notes/highlighting/underlining because I do not want to see someone else’s analysis until after I have done my own.

    Liked by 3 people

  4. Jess T. says:

    As a college student I can rarely afford books, so when I get the rare chance to touch one I usually keep notes with post-its. They have really small colored ones that are great to keep tabs!

    Liked by 4 people

  5. James J. Cudney IV says:

    Hi. I really enjoyed this post. And you make several great points. I’ve got a clear line on when / how it’s acceptable: (a) If it belongs to someone else, don’t write in it, and (b) if it belongs to me, I can do what I want. That said, there are two ways I think about writing in books that are mine: (1) If I love the book and want to re-read it again, I wouldn’t write in it so I can see the beauty of a “clean” copy, and then buy a second if I need to write in it, or (2) if it’s being used for research, future notes, just something to have to reference, I’ll write it in all I want.

    As a writer and hopefully published author in the not-too-distant future, I have absolutely no issues with someone writing in my book. I own the words and creativity, but the readers own the response to it. And if writing in it makes the experience all that better or more useful, I encourage it.

    Posts like this one are fantastic. It helps people think, brings new folks together and opens up fair dialogue. Excellent job, and thank you for sharing it.

    Liked by 7 people

    • theorangutanlibrarian says:

      Thank you so much!! Absolutely agree with you- I definitely draw the line between my books and other people’s books. I watched a youtube video on this before, where the person talked about writing in books they’d borrowed from a friend, and saw red- I just cannot believe someone could think that’s acceptable. Yeah I can understand that- for me I have a different rule about books I keep clean (basically for certain genres I prefer clean copies). But I definitely keep certain books for referencing and analysing, so will annotate.
      Ahh I’m glad you feel that way!! Yes definitely agree with you there 🙂
      Thank you so much for your brilliant comment!!

      Liked by 2 people

  6. Fictionophile says:

    I used to work as a library cataloger, so as far as library books go I’d have to say “DO NOT WRITE IN THEM”! Library books should come to each reader as fresh and new as a book from the bookstore.
    Your own books are another matter. Write away! They are yours to do whatever you want with. Underlining and arrows save a lot of time when writing reviews and they remind us of important passages when re-reading. Your own notations are invaluable for content analysis.

    Liked by 5 people

  7. HowlinBooks says:

    This is one of the reasons I like ebooks. It’s so easy to highlight and add notes to sections. With paperbacks, I make notes on post-it notes. I don’t usually write too much, I’m usually in too much of a hurry to read the book! I keep a journal for library books.

    With other people’s annotations, I’d rather read the book first and then read their thoughts.

    Great post 🙂

    Liked by 4 people

    • theorangutanlibrarian says:

      Oh yes I get that!! I do the same with ebooks! Ahh I get that. I personally don’t much like post its in books cos they fall out, but to each their own 😉 I very rarely do this these days, cos like you I mostly just want to read the book these days and I don’t do it for genre fiction anyway.
      Yeah I agree on that- I only really liked the highlighted sections in non fic when I was doing my degree cos it saved time 😉
      Thank you! 😀

      Liked by 2 people

  8. Briana says:

    I write in books occasionally, depending on my mood. I do think it can be helpful to have the analysis right on the page and to be able to come back to it later. Nothing like taking notes in a book in one class only to have to read the same book in a different class…and realize you already have some of the work done.

    I don’t see why writing in books should be that egregious to anyone. Books are readily accessible to most of us. (Not to everyone, obviously, but that’s not really the question at hand.) There are hundreds of thousands of copies of say, Leaves of Grass, in the world. If I write on one, it’s fine; there are more just like it. This isn’t the Middle Ages and we’re not destroying one of a kind handwritten manuscripts.

    Liked by 3 people

    • theorangutanlibrarian says:

      Yes absolutely- agree! Yes exactly!! 😀 So helpful!!
      Yeah nor do I- but then, I’ve done it so long, it’s normal to me. Yes precisely!! Like you said- it’s not the middle ages and it’s not like I’d do it to an expensive/valuable book. I really don’t see it as a problem 😉
      Thanks for commenting!!

      Like

  9. Books, Vertigo and Tea says:

    I rarely write in my books, but I obsessively tab them and fill them with mini post its 😉 So go for it! I totally get it. Sometimes I enjoy picking up a used book and discovering another person’s markings. It is like a story within a story!

    Liked by 3 people

  10. MFlynn says:

    This is such an interesting question… I love seeing other people’s writing and notes in books (and actually kind of make a point of buying used books with writing in them) but the only time I end up making notes in an actual book is for works of nonfiction, essays- that kind of thing. I am really intrigued by what might happen if I marked up my poetry books though, since I’m trying to read more and still am pretty lacking in understanding when I read the actual verses. Writing and dissecting on the actual page could help me examine the components with a better eye.

    One thing I will say- I do regret the times I used pen on my books. Not that I’ve ever gone back to erase my pencil annotations, but the fact that I cannot do that with my pen notes makes me unhappy for some reason.

    Liked by 4 people

    • theorangutanlibrarian says:

      Ahh I absolutely understand that- I tend to do the same. Yes, I understand that. Poetry is always harder to dissect- but I do recommend that practice, it’s very effective. I hope it helps!!
      Ahh I can understand that. I’ve done that from time to time, but I agree, I much prefer to write in pencil- partly cos I can erase them and partly because it looks a lot more inoffensive.

      Liked by 1 person

      • MFlynn says:

        I think I’ll have to try it for the poetry- I’m going on the fragments I can remember from the one poetry-writing class I took, and the results are less than satisfactory. Especially when it’s really clear there’s a lot more I could be getting out of it.

        Liked by 3 people

        • theorangutanlibrarian says:

          Ahh well I hope it works out 🙂 I think it’s hard at first, but maybe start with basics like literally pointing out structure and form, then moving onto things like rhyme, then imagery etc and before you know it, you’ll be on your way!! Hope that helps a little!

          Liked by 1 person

          • MFlynn says:

            I’ll definitely give that a shot, thank you so much for the tips! I look forward to taking the next look at my current poetry collection with them in mind 🙂

            Like

  11. Bookstooge says:

    As long as it is your own book, scribble away. But if it’s not, I’ll hunt you down and hang you for it.
    I buy books JUST to write in. My current classic, Don Quixote, I bought a cheap edition so I could scribble away. I wouldn’t do it in a collectible or hardcover edition though. I’ll probably do the same thing for whatever classic I do next. Paperbacks are cheap, cheap in quality too, so why NOT put your thoughts right there?

    Liked by 3 people

  12. The Mundane Teenage Life says:

    I don’t really have an issue when people write in books about things actually related to the book and the writing. In fact it makes for interesting insights and additions to the text. What bothers me is when I borrow books from the library and they have unrelated random scribbles and doodles. Personally, I don’t write in my books unless I have it as part of my courses in class.

    Liked by 4 people

  13. yaykisspurr says:

    Since most of the books I read are digital I like to highlight and export those out if I want to examine them closer. For a non fiction book that I purchased I’d totally highlight and underline! It’s the best way to revisit what you’ve read without re-reading the book if you want to brush up on the subject. Such a good discussion post!

    Liked by 3 people

  14. RamblingLisa says:

    I would write in poetry books mostly but there is a rare occasion that I have written in books. I think back to my books for school and they were scribbled all over but I guess school is very different…plus it was about 20 years ago so I can pretend it didn’t happen lol
    I am torn on the subject, it does depend on the book, age and so on, but if it is something where you know you want to write on it and can get a copy that it can be done on then yeah it’s totally your choice. I will point out though that if ANYONE wrote on my books I would probably smack them silly 😐

    Liked by 4 people

  15. Grace says:

    I write and highlight in nonfiction books by authors about their writing journey and tips. I also highlight and write in some of my favorite classics. I think it’s a great idea to do so, my only reservation is that I buy 2nd hand books and I wouldn’t want someone else to write or highlight in my copy so I don’t sell or give my “extra used” copies back.

    Liked by 2 people

    • theorangutanlibrarian says:

      Ahh I am the same about non fiction and classics. Ahh I’ the same- I don’t give away my annotated copies, because it would just be weird. Plus by the time I’ve highlighted/annotated it, it’s become wayyy too personal for me to give it away.

      Liked by 2 people

  16. dragonsandzombies says:

    I used to do that as well, when I was still going to uni 🙂 I was studying English/American Literature and well… All of my Poe collections & short story collections look pretty ‘well used’ I would say 😀 I also used to underline nice quotes and put a sticky note in so I can write it down later.

    Liked by 4 people

  17. Emily | Rose Read says:

    Great post! I don’t write in books simply because I don’t like stopping. I don’t like to stop my flow to write something down. If I’m actually reading something more academically, I will write, but usually on post-its cause I use library books for school cause MONEY lol. I have nothing against writing in books, and I agree that having someone annotate my work would be a high compliment!

    Liked by 3 people

    • theorangutanlibrarian says:

      Thank you!! That’s fair!! I find it easier to keep the flow going if I just write in the book 😉 Ahh yeah I never wrote in library books but for most of what I studied I had to get a second hand copy, cos they just didn’t stock hundreds of copies of popular classics for my course. Ahh I’m glad you agree!! 😀

      Liked by 1 person

  18. Angelica (TheBookCoverGirls) says:

    I love writing in books *for academic purposes only!* Unless it’s for school I do not think I could write on one of my pretty new hardcovers that I buy. That would give such anxiety! But for school I’m all for it. It helps me think, even though the first time I did it I was freaking out. You would have thought I had committed a crime with how bad I felt after highlighting my first line haha. Anyway great post!

    Liked by 3 people

    • theorangutanlibrarian says:

      Ahh yes agree!! Yeah I’m the same about pretty books- I could never write in those either- I totally agree with you there. I just do/did it for studying too. Yeah I feel like it helps too. Hahha I don’t know if it makes me a maverick that I’ve always found it easy to do for school 😉 Thank you!!

      Liked by 1 person

  19. Krysta says:

    I never understand why people think it’s wrong to write in books because, as you say, annotation is an important way to read actively! I can see wanting to use tabs or something instead, but I don’t think we should discourage people from interacting with the text as some people seem to do. 😦

    Liked by 4 people

  20. Chris C Barnett says:

    I think most writers would be delighted to have inspired someone to have a good old think about they’d written. And then for the reader to be sufficiently moved to write those thoughts down, that seems to me just about the ultimate goal of writing something.

    Liked by 4 people

  21. Matthew Wright says:

    I don’t write in books, but I’ve leafed through some of my own titles in libraries and noticed that readers have added their own words in places. Speaking as an author it’s always interesting to read their reactions to what I’ve written.

    Liked by 4 people

  22. MyBookJacket says:

    I agree with you 100 perfect. I don’t personally annotate my books but I do annotate non fiction. I used to write in my poetry books when in school and college but I no longer do that. Mainly because if I don’t want to keep a book I tend to sell it or swap it so an annotated book would have almost no takers. But receiving annotated books is so much fun!

    Liked by 4 people

    • theorangutanlibrarian says:

      yay- I’m glad you agree 😀 Ah yes I understand that. I certainly do it less now and mostly just annotate non fiction now. Ahh yes I understand that- I’m the same about swapping books or giving them away too- I can only do it if it’s “clean”- but like you, I’d actually be happy to receive an annotated book!!

      Liked by 1 person

  23. LizScanlon says:

    Ha… Interesting to see the comments, quite a few people who write in their books… I do, too. I only write in books if I own them of course and one of my most dogeared, underlined book is… wait for it… Seven Deadly Sins by Corey Taylor 😀 I think every 1 to 2 pages there’s either a dog ear or a scribble…
    so yeah.. I don’t mind dog ears nor writing in books… as someone else above said- if it’s your book, you do what you want with it.

    Liked by 4 people

  24. Donna | Chocolate'n'Waffles says:

    I used to be a true advocate for not writing in books but I found that I love highlighting my favorite quotes in physical copies the same way I do with my Kindle, and some sentences that makes me think would also deserve a bit of pen… It’s tricky because I love my books to be looking good but I agree with the fact it makes them more personal. I just need the right pens, haha!

    Liked by 3 people

  25. Sophie @ Blame Chocolate says:

    I can’t… I JUST CAN’T XD
    I understand why people do it and it makes total sense, but I can’t even write on a beautiful notebook without feeling guilty (even though that’s its exact purpose, UGH) let alone a BOOK.
    I once had a fit when a classmate of mine returned a book I’d landed to her with UNDERLINED SENTENCES. I just lost it.
    Thankfully, it was all pencil and I could erase them but I could never trust a human being with my books again XD Or, at least, I expressly tell them I’ll kill them if they ruin it beforehand 😀

    Liked by 5 people

    • theorangutanlibrarian says:

      hahaha I understand- funnily enough, I take ages to break in beautiful notebooks too 😉
      Ahhh I would go crazy if *someone else* underlined or highlighted my book- even if I had done that- it’s just not cool to write in other people’s books. (I know that may not make sense, but it really bothers me) That would make me lose faith in people too 😉 Ironically I can’t stand other people messing with my books!!

      Like

  26. readingforsanitymom says:

    I think your right about the humanities degree and writing in books, as my sister is graduate of that degree and always scribbles on her books. I am a finance graduate on the other hand, and i dont even like one scratch on my books lol.

    Liked by 4 people

  27. Tiana (The Book Raven) says:

    I’m so happy to see this discussion! Especially with classics it is super helpful to write in the book to better analyze the meaning. I especially love finding an annotated book in a thrift store! It’s insightful and often far more intriguing. As always, great post!

    Liked by 4 people

  28. Jackie B @ Death by Tsundoku says:

    It makes me so happy to see this here! While I am not one to write in books, I have never found it to bother me when there is writing in books *which are not mine*. I love it when my books are pristine. Why? Who knows. I’m a perfectionist. But, like you said, it’s nice to pick up a library book and see the underlining or the stars around the pages. As someone who never learned to analyze writing formally, I like to pick that apart. These annotations help me see things I never would have before, and I never would learn otherwise.

    But, yes, please don’t write in my books. 😉

    P.S. Any chance we can see that Wilde photo larger? I’d love to better examine what your annotations look like!

    Liked by 4 people

  29. Martin says:

    Interesting post. I don’t think I’ve ever written in a book, although when I couldn’t afford canvas I did take the hard covers off some books and paint pictures on them. (That sounds awful, I’m sure they were being thrown away or something).
    I once read a book (Schindler’s Ark) that had been written all over because it had been a friend’s A level text. I found it didn’t affect my reading enjoyment, in fact it increased it because I could see their thoughts. It was like having a conversation about the book while reading it.

    Liked by 4 people

  30. Lashaan (Bookidote) says:

    Absolutely nothing here that I disagree with! 😛 I personally don’t write in the fiction books I read, even classics, just because I want them “clean” for rereads. I do use post-its though and I prefer thinking that my reviews sum up all the necessary “notes” I need for any future reads. But this whole post did make me wonder about the use of having multiple copies (one cheap and one pretty) for a better reading experience. I’d gladly write away in a book if I knew I had a pretty copy somewhere. I think the only types of books where I wouldn’t mind writing directly in it are non-fiction just cause of how helpful notes will always be. I have to agree that when I find library copies of non-fiction books for academic purposes, my happiness reaches for the sky! 😀 Great post, as always! 😉

    Liked by 2 people

    • theorangutanlibrarian says:

      Yay!!! So glad you agree!! I get that- I’m very specific about genres I write in- and don’t usually write in most fiction books, cos I like them “clean” too. And yes, I try to do that more recently with reviews too 🙂 But I definitely find it useful for classics and happily write in non fiction- it’s just so helpful! hahaha I’m glad I’m not the only one on that- although I do remember everyone I met at uni felt the same way about that! 😉 Thank you!! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  31. Christy Luis says:

    Totally agree! Writing in books helps me pick out the important bits. I do tend to use sticky notes, if I can, and I usually have to anyway because I use library books. But if I own a book, it gets highlights Lol Great post!

    Liked by 2 people

  32. livesinstone says:

    *Gasp* Ok, Now that that is out of my system, great post! I usually find it annoying when I find things written in library books, but mostly because it distracts me from my reading experience. I do have a horrible case of the writing-in-a-book-is-sacrilege’s that I’ve never been able to get over, that I caught young, so that is probably why it bugs me. 🙂 I also remember lending out a favorite book as a kid and having it come back all dog eared and with a broken spine so I may have been traumatized early in this regard, and all my books are precious to me. That being said, I could see the advantages if you needed to read something for uni if the notes were helpful. I also think I would have to agree that there could be no higher complement than to have someone write in a book that you have actually written, because they obviously read the heck out of that thing. Huh. I never thought I could condone that…Well done. 🙂

    Liked by 3 people

  33. Thoughts on Fantasy says:

    Ah a controversial topic indeed 🙂 Having worked in a library (albeit a small one) the sight of writing in books does annoy me a little. Simple underlining and margin notes not so much, but because I worked at a foreign language school library, people would write English translations underneath the foreign text, which kind of defeated the purpose of using the books for language practise… especially if they wrote the answers to the questions in the exercise books!

    But I totally understand people writing in their own copies. Like you said, it can personalise them, and also help in analysing them. I still find it hard to do it myself (I dare not destroy the perfection of the unmarred page!) but I don’t get annoyed seeing other people do it.

    Liked by 4 people

  34. Captain's Quarters says:

    Ahoy there matey! This post was filled with interesting facts and comments. I didn’t know that ye can highlight and comment on the kindle and export it! That is all kinds of awesome. I do not write in me books but would like to see annotations on classics written down. I guess I like when smarter people than I do the work. I know there are professional annotations for Dracula and Alice in wonderland. I also loved the comments and photo concerning Silmarillion. I used to highlight definitions in textbooks while gettin’ me degrees. But other than that nuthin’. But when I get used books I do find it fascinating to read quotes folk underline. And I love book inscriptions and notes in the front. I get rather whimsical in thinking about how the book got to the reader and what the person’s life was like. In fact I wrote about in in one of me posts. Link below if ye like. No pressure. Thank ye kindly fer this post. Loved it.
    x The Captain

    https://thecaptainsquartersblog.wordpress.com/2016/09/27/the-captains-log-the-wanderer-sharon-creech/

    Liked by 3 people

    • theorangutanlibrarian says:

      Thank you so much!! I’m glad you liked it!! Yes, it’s a really brilliant thing- though I don’t tend to export it, I find it helpful that you can see all the highlighted parts in one place. Ah yes, I like when other people highlight for me 😉 Ahh yes, it’s so common in uni :p Oh awesome- I will absolutely check it out!! 😀

      Like

  35. Abbie says:

    I save writing for my absolute -favourite- books. You know you’ve reached my soul if I’ve started highlighting passages and scrawling notes in the margins. My pet peeve is people who fold the cover all the way around to the back when they read. Whyyyyyyy!!!

    Like

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