Oh Kill Me It’s The Killables

killablesC’mon, doesn’t that name sound like the worst boy band ever? I should have known what this book was gonna be like from just that title. But I gave it a chance… Why? I hear you ask…

Well once upon a time, before dystopias became a popular thing (aka before the Hunger Games) there was this great series called The Declaration. It was original, clever and had a strong voice. The series, unfortunately, went the way so many of its kind go- to the world resetting to its original state and basically undoing all the work of the story. But the fundamentals were still halfway decent, even if it did make that error of recapping too much in the sequels. So, in answer to the question I posed, I picked this book up to see what an author I had already been impressed with could recreate the magic she had made so long ago. Would she though?

Short answer is no. Not even slightly. This book sucked. The premise was something we’ve all seen before- evil society tries to eradicate evil… therefore becoming evil. The twist on this was totally lousy. Spoiler alert: they haven’t really eradicated evil, who’d have thunk it. And the conclusion was just plain dumb. There’s no such thing as evil… Ye wot?!

Add to that some lame ass characters and *surprise surprise* a love triangle and I am left wondering what on earth possessed the author. I mean, seriously? Why the hell would anyone think, after writing a successful series that wasn’t jam packed with tropes, that what they needed to do next was write the most cliché copycat tropeish nonsense imaginable? I just don’t get this one.

Conclusion: if you get the desire to read a decent dystopia pick up The Declaration, this isn’t worth your time. I gave it one measly banana.

hand-drawn-banana

Sincerely,

The Orangutan Librarian- reading shit books since 2015 so you don’t have to…

*Okay I’ve been reading rubbish books a lot longer than that- this was just my way to shoehorn in that it’s my bloggiversary- my blog is 2 today!!

 bloggiversary 2

It certainly doesn’t feel like it’s been 2 years (partly cos this is actually just the anniversary of my domain name 😉 ) but I just wanted to say a *MASSIVE THANK YOU* to everyone that’s been following along- whether for a day or for the whole shebang!!

Alright, now back to the book- let’s face it, you’re not gonna read this one… So I’ll ask a different question- what’s your least favourite dystopia? Let me know in the comments!

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79 thoughts on “Oh Kill Me It’s The Killables

  1. Nel says:

    Happy blogversary! I generally stay away from dystopias lately specifically because Hunger Games. I may be one of few, but I didn’t even like that trilogy very much (sorry!). Ones I do remember enjoying, and they’re kind of older, were The Handmaid’s Tale and the Giver series.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Bookstooge says:

    ♪Death Metal♪Screaming♪Music♪
    I LOVE the Killables. They’re my favorite (non-existent) band!

    And congrats on the 2 years. That is quite an accomplishment these days, with people starting up willy-nilly and flaming out in months. Trust your next 2 years will be even better…

    Liked by 1 person

    • theorangutanlibrarian says:

      Aww thank you!! I love yours too!! Hehe I better had, hadn’t I? 😉 Haha it really did- usually I have at least one good thing to say, but with this I finished it and just thought “well that’s two hours of my life I’m never getting back”. It’s not the worst book in the world… but I can’t think of a single reason to recommend it.

      Like

  3. Joelendil says:

    Happy Blogiversary!

    As far as least favorite dystopia, I know I’m in a minority, but I really didn’t care for the Hunger Games trilogy. The central concept was cool, but didn’t care for several elements of it:

    The world building: the districts seem relatively small, yet they also seem to cover the entire former US… there’s no way that there wouldn’t be all kinds of loners and/or rebels living in the vast spaces between districts.

    Katniss: aside from her initial self-sacrificial volunteering she has to be wheedled, prodded, and even tricked into fighting the system almost every step of the way.

    Love triangle: blergh

    Liked by 1 person

    • theorangutanlibrarian says:

      Thank you!!
      Yeah I can understand that- though I liked it (mostly cos of the concept), it was not without its flaws and I could see why others wouldn’t.
      Yes- that makes a lot of sense- I didn’t worry about that too much- but I did wonder what was in the world beyond the US and how everyone got so cut off from each other.
      Ah yes very true- I think Katniss was still one of the things I liked cos I found her believable. But as for the love triangle… yeuch. (I also blame that love triangle together with the dumbass one in twilight for making authors think that every YA needs a love triangle :/ )

      Like

  4. Marie says:

    Hahaha I laughed so hard at the end of your review, thank you for reading so many shitty books for us haha :p
    CONGRATULATIONS on 2 years of blogging, this is SO great and I’m so happy to have been part of your adventure. I hope you’ll keep on blogging for a long, long time 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Anna says:

    Happy blogiversary!!! I always love reading your reviews and I hope you’ll keep blogging for a long, long time. Otherwise, who would warn us not to read the Killables? 😜

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Briana says:

    Happy blogoversary!

    I’ve read a decent number of dystopians I don’t like, most of which simply weren’t memorable. One was A Girl Called Fearless. I hate to say this, but I often find “Women are being used purely as breeders and commodities!” dystopians a little over the top, but this was was particularly unbelievable because there was basically NO transition period from modern day America to “women no longer have rights and are being sold by their fathers to breed.” Because all the grown women died from a food-borne virus or something weird, so the leftover men decided to “protect” the remaining females, all under 18, (right…a virus that knows whether you’re 18 or not) by taking away all their rights. This is just stupid. These are men who married women, worked with women, knew women and thought they were equal to men…and then just decided overnight “Nah, women shouldn’t vote or drive or anything.” So absurd. I didn’t buy a word of it.

    Liked by 1 person

    • theorangutanlibrarian says:

      Thank you!!
      Oh tell me about it!! And I actually couldn’t agree more. I just don’t buy the whole thing- there needs to be some logical reason for this and there usually isn’t. Partly cos it actually ends up implying some pretty dreadful things. Firstly it implies that women are so weak willed that they’d all just go along with it and that a lot of women would be complicit in this kind of madness. Secondly it implies that pretty much all men are monsters, because not only would they do this, but no one would stand up for said weak-willed women. It’s all ironically quite patronising and sexist. So no, I don’t buy it either. And also that doesn’t make any sense in that story either- cos if women were so valuable then surely they’d be revered more. I don’t even get why most women dying would mean that everyone hates women all of a sudden?! *sigh* I swear some dystopias make no sense.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. deesradreadsandreviews says:

    Happy blogiversary 😀

    I’m happy that I came across your blog today. I really enjoyed your review. I’m sorry you didn’t enjoy the book. That is quite the title. I look forward to reading more of your reviews.

    I give you all the bananas
    🍌 🍌🍌🍌🍌

    Like

  8. Jackie B @ Death by Tsundoku says:

    HAPPY BLOGOVERSARY! Two years is a huge deal!

    …It’s a shame it lined up with a total flop of a book, but that’s okay. I wonder what happened to Gemma Malley to make this writing change so much? Shame. Should those of us interested in The Declaration read the series, or just book one? 😉

    Liked by 1 person

    • theorangutanlibrarian says:

      Thank you so much!!! hehe yes, it was a bit. I have no idea- I think it may have something to do with getting released around the first Hunger Games (so before the hype) but her series not taking off as much? This is pure speculation, but that seems to have made her decide to write something more generic *sigh*. I’d recommend book 1 and then see how you go- personally I think it works as a standalone and while I didn’t hate the sequels, I didn’t love them. I think I probably would have been fine leaving it at book 1, cos I thought it ended there for ages.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Sophie @ Blame Chocolate says:

    First off, happy bloganniversary!!! ❤
    Second, no, I won't be reading this one XD Sounds like a complete waste of time, really.
    I had never heard of The Declaration, but if it has your seal of approval, I will definitely try it!
    I don't have a favorite dystopian, I don't think… The first one I read was The Hunger Games but the series has greatly disappointed me after book one. Nothing has impressed me much since.
    Great review! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • theorangutanlibrarian says:

      Thank you!!! ❤
      hahaha good choice!! 😉
      It really was!! 😄 Ah I actually really enjoyed that one. And I liked Hunger Games too- I get that though- I never find the sequels of dystopias as good as the first one (the same is true of the Declaration- the first one's much better than the rest of the series). Thank you!!

      Liked by 1 person

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