Does Book Twitter Actually Reflect the Reading Community?

Every year in free speech week, I try to exercise my freedom and talk about aspects of this (apparently contentious) topic. Yet this year I want to do something different. Not because we have reached the zenith of free speech- far from it. Despite the job losses, tragedies and general morose of 2020, the Twitterati have nothing better to do and have been busy cancelling, well, anything and everything. Which is why I wanted to talk about this tweet:

Maybe (most likely) it’s just my confirmation bias talking, but I think it’s such an excellent point. Disclaimer for book twitter: there are some nice little bubbles where you can play around with likeminded people (/primates)… Buuuut it’s not all fun and games. Twitter is kinda known for how toxic it can get. While it’s not the only place cancel culture thrives, it’s certainly one of the hotspots. I can’t tell you how often I go on twitter, see people congregating round an issue and think “oh no, who’s getting cancelled today?” Even if it’s a case of valid criticism, the platform doesn’t exactly lend itself to nuanced conversation and this leads to things getting heated pretty fast. And too often publishers get a whiff of the smoke and are scared off- but this needn’t be the case.

You see, (and forgive me if this is obvious) twitter is not reflective of the public at large. This is hardly a revelation. Looking at just some of the research (focusing on the States, given that 70% of users are from there… which you should bear in mind if you’re from outside the US like me), most twitter users in the US are more likely to have a college degree and have a higher income than the national average. Just 20% of US can be classed as active users (ie go on the platform once a month)- and of that number 80% of tweets come from the most active 10%. Meaning we’re only hearing from about 2% of the population. It probably isn’t any wonder then that (and many people will hate me for saying this) twitter often strikes me as an elitist club. As much as people claim that twitter is designed to give a voice to the voiceless, that it’s a great way for the powerless to have some power for themselves, that the gangs running rampant on there are noble “working class” vigilantes… I can’t see any evidence it’s representative of this. Observationally, I’d say the vast majority of big users are marketing/PR people, the so-called faces for faceless corporations, journos, professional activists and politicians. Ordinary people (ie consumers) aren’t represented on there for the most part… making me question, why is it taken so seriously?  

Time and again, it’s proven to not be a good source for elections for instance (which makes sense, given that even if a politician gets 100,000 likes, this isn’t a huge number considering… especially considering this can come from a global audience). Likewise, buzz on twitter doesn’t mean much- as excitable as twitter can seem about a reboot, this may not translate to actual fans buying tickets.

Similar logic can be applied to book twitter. A lot of readers don’t hang out on twitter. As the above tweet shows, it’s not necessarily going to reflect how well a book performs (especially since big names are so often targeted). It’s always been pretty debatable whether this particular platform even sell books. Anecdotally, I can also say that a lot of readers see the fires burning and run away. And even if they do stick around, a lot of people don’t want to get into the middle of a confrontation (giving the false impression that the debates are one-sided).

Which is why I wish publishers would take twitter with a pinch of salt. Instead of going off how angry someone can get in 140 characters or how many clapping emojis a person can use in one go, maybe just maybe, they can hold their nerve and wait for the general reading public to vote with their wallets. Maybe it’s time we ignored the drama flaming on twitter.

Ooh err, hope I don’t get burned at the stake for this one! 😉 But given I do actually like free speech- I’m open to hearing your thoughts! What do you think about book twitter? Do you think it’s representative of the reading public? Let me know in the comments!

111 thoughts on “Does Book Twitter Actually Reflect the Reading Community?

  1. Great post! I personally have found great books to read from Twitter, so I think it does help sell books. But I’ve also seen massive pile on’s on certain books where very few people seem to actually read the thing (Troubled Blood being one recent example) so I take usually ignore the screaming on Twitter and look outside of it too.

    Liked by 4 people

  2. I have a Twitter account… but most of the time it is more of an indirect. Every now and then I’ll link one of my blog posts there. Every now and then when I bother to post on Instagram I’ll slide the thing that tells it to post to my Twitter account. But I don’t engage much if at all on the platform. To be fair though, I don’t engage too much with any social media platform. (Here is where I do the most interaction and it really isn’t that much.) Part of it is laziness, part of it is that validation trap stuff that I try to avoid like the plague (mostly by not posting), the algorithms also increase the validation trap stuff. And that’s also what’s hard about Twitter too. The algorithms are fed by repeatedly posting a lot and getting reactions. Outrage and controversy get reactions.

    Liked by 3 people

  3. I definitely don’t love Twitter. It always feels to me like it’s a lot of people shouting into a void for attention. And really, one of the easiest ways to get someone to pay attention to such a short statement is to make it a little bit inflammatory. I also think it’s unlikely I’ve ever sold many books through Twitter, but I’m on it because it’s expected and so people do sometimes look to connect with me there. I’m shocked to discover that as a person who at least Tweets a blog post once a week, I am in the “regular users” category. Makes me feel a little better about the world, though.

    Liked by 2 people

  4. Say it louder for the people in the back. I must admit, I don’t enage a lot in the book twitter community and am only ever on the fringe when it comes to understanding the latest dramas. It’s almost exhausting to see how quickly a tweet is twisted and taken out of proportion then turned into a collective manhunt. I’m all for listening to valid criticism, but I just feel like twitter likes to be overly dramatic about it. I agree that twitter is not a valid reflection of the reader community, but I’ll stick to the nice bubble I seem to have found on the fringes haha.

    Liked by 3 people

  5. You make some great points here! I have a Twitter account and I tend to browse a lot, but I don’t often actually post on there or engage with anyone, because from what I can see, it’s a scary, very toxic place.
    I agree that people make more of a big deal about it than they should though. It isn’t representative of most people, and definitely not most of the audience of books etc. A book or author may be considered ‘cancelled’ on book twitter, but there’s millions of people out there who won’t know anything about it, and will happily by that book.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Finally someone said it. Thank you for this post!! I never knew about those stats before but they make sense. I can see Twitter as an upper echelon soiree, 100%. Honestly, as a social media platform it intimidates me a little. For example, how quickly people get mad and attack one another for their opinions. It IS toxic, and the whole cancel culture trend too like you mentioned. It can’t be a true representation at all of the reading community at all.

    Liked by 3 people

  7. I hate Twitter 😣 I think is extremely toxic overall and the book community is also very toxic. I have seen things that makes me want to roll my eyes and just close the tab. I don’t use Twitter that much except to retweet posts I enjoy. I only have it to log in from time to time. The fact everything is taken wrong, your opinion is fought and everyone is cancelling everything for not reason is so damn exhausting and not worth it. I have never truly enjoy the Twitting experience.

    Liked by 2 people

  8. Okay THANK YOU this post is great. One of my biggest peeves with book twitter is how they seem to think that it’s a reflection of everyone who reads. There was a tweet not too long ago where someone said something like “without book twitter, y’all wouldn’t have any sales”, which I find so frustrating and self-centred. Like, do you really think book bloggers/people on book twitter make up that much of the book community? Of everyone I know in my personal life who is also a reader, I’m the only one who uses any social media to talk about books. Idk it just seems conceited to think that the online book community accurately reflects the real book community

    Liked by 3 people

  9. I actually find Twitter to be a poor reflection of ANY community, not just the reading one 😛 Sadly, there are a good number of toxic users on there whose sole purpose on the platform is to make everyone else’s lives as miserable as theirs. They may seem like the reflection of the reading community, but only because they are so outspoken. The true majority, however, aren’t even on Twitter because they have better things to do than to pontificate on social media and tear down anything they don’t agree with.

    Liked by 4 people

  10. Although I have a Twitter account for my blog, I do hate the platform because of its toxicity. I don’t believe it represents the reading community, but that’s just my opinion not backed up by any facts other than it doesn’t reflect what I think about certain things. I hardly interact on there other than to share posts that really grab my attention. When I hear of bookish drama on there, it’s often because it then kicks off a series of booktube videos in response to whatever it is. It seems like a very exhausting platform.
    I think you’ve put together a great post here and I appreciate the stats.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Yeah same. I think I had an inkling… but when I look at the numbers/stats it does seem to be a tiny proportion of people (and whenever there’s a scandal about a book, such as the whole thing around ninth house, the people complaining about it don’t seem to stop far more people reading it and liking it for what it was). Ah yes I agree with you here.
      Thank you!

      Like

  11. I’ve been thinking this for years. Book Twitter is an incredibly tiny percentage of the population, but they seem to control a lot of the publishing industry. And it doesn’t make sense to me. I can’t help but think that if people would get off Twitter and just go about their normal lives, they’d start to realize book Twitter isn’t that powerful and they don’t need to do everything it says. Because the reality is the majority of readers probably don’t even know book Twitter exists, much less agree with everything it says. Sometimes I tell people in real life stuff that’s going on on book Twitter and they inevitably seem stunned and horrified, and then they get confused that people even care.

    Liked by 2 people

  12. As per usual, I agree with your thorough and intelligent takes!! I definitely also view Twitter as a space for the “elite”, generally speaking, not to mention the fact that it’s a massive echo chamber–whether that’s with regards to cancel culture, politics, and more.

    Liked by 3 people

  13. I’ve had the same feelings and experiences as a lot of people in the comments.

    I’ve also been thinking for a long time that Twitter does not represent most readers, and I really like that you pointed out the statistics of exactly how few people use Twitter and then even fewer use it frequently. I often see people who ARE on Twitter baffled and angry that a book that has been “cancelled” is selling well and has positive reviews on Goodreads–because they don’t realize that the Twitter bubble is not representative of the wider population.

    I know a lot of readers in real life, and not a single one is involved in the online book community in any way. They don’t even know Book Twitter exists, and they certainly don’t base their reading choices on what Book Twitter thinks. If I happened to tell them about something that happened or had been “decided” on Twitter, they either wouldn’t care or would think the people on Twitter are nuts. If you’re IN the community, everything can feel very urgent and like a very big deal. Reading the “wrong” books or liking the “wrong” authors can have real consequences in terms of people arguing with you or telling you that you shouldn’t read or like the book. If you’re NOT in the community, these all abstract ideas that have no actual bearing on your life.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Yeah I feel like it’s a really well kept secret that twitter has such a small community… despite the fact the information is readily available for everyone. Haha yeah that’s true as well. I don’t think people on twitter realise how unrepresentative they are of the general population. In my experience, it’s one of the biggest examples of how social media can become an echo chamber.

      Yeah me too. And yeah that’s very true as well. I think where it becomes a problem (and relevant) is that publishers *do* seem to think that book twitter has this huge significance and will cancel a book because of it.

      Like

  14. I’m not on Book Twitter, but in general, I think most bookish communities are geared towards other book-sharers (was going to say bloggers but that would leave out youtube, instagram, etc). I don’t really know many readers who are silent about their reading online but fill their feed with book-themed accounts, and I would think that vocal book people are the minority rather than the majority.

    So I would think that many readers (the general reading public?) get their information through word of mouth or via reading reviews on sites like Goodreads and Amazon. Or maybe facebook communities/forums.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. I do agree with you. I think, in general the vocal book community are a minority (so then it stands to reason, since the vocal book community aren’t all on twitter, it’s really not representative of every reader).
      And yes that’s true. I think there’s also booksellers and libraries- which play a huge part (but it’s probably mostly amazon to be perfectly honest)

      Liked by 1 person

  15. I honestly take both with a grain of salt these days, and especially this year. I only listen to the opinions of those who I actually trust with books. I’m thinking of Rowling. Her book has suddenly become a best seller, and I suspect it’s because, not because it’s a great read. But because of her popularity with transphobic people, who have all gone out and bought it.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I think Rowling is actually a decent example of how Book Twitter doesn’t represent everyone, though. I do think the news about her has been big enough that it’s leaked off Twitter. I’ve seen articles about her on Buzzfeed and some major news sites, for instance. But I also know A LOT of readers who still know nothing about Rowling as a person or her recently expressed views and who would pick up her latest book simply because they’d read the previous books in the series, liked them, and wanted to read the newest one.

      Liked by 2 people

        1. I actually know a couple people who hadn’t heard about Rowling. One is an older gentleman who vaguely knew Rowling was in the news again, but didn’t know why and obviously hadn’t cared enough to look it up. I also know a couple people who don’t have social media, so they were unaware. And I know people who don’t have internet (or didn’t pre-pandemic). There’s a fair percentage of people in the U.S. who don’t have reliable access to broadband internet, especially in rural areas, so I can totally see a bunch of people having no idea about Rowling, especially because what’s trending on Twitter moves so fast. One scandal on book Twitter can be gone in days or maybe hours. There’s also the fact that a lot of people just don’t care. Maybe they did see some sort of headline about Twitter and they just scrolled by. I follow book news and I don’t and can’t keep up with everything.

          Liked by 3 people

  16. I think everything is blown out of proportion on Twitter and it’s like a tool for ‘mass hysteria’ – someone says something (from their POV) and bang, it gets misinterpreted or put into a new perspective and we have a landslide. It’s crazy and the so called ‘cancel culture’ – don’t get me started. so, I’ll show myself out XD

    Liked by 2 people

  17. This was very insightful and gracefully written. Couldn’t agree more. I have a Twitter account but I rarely go on there. I’m not a fan of the bookish community. Too much drama. The only time I truly pay attention is if I’m in the mood for some entertainment. I know some valid points are being made on book twitter at times, but it’s hard to sift through and find those kernels of truth or reason…The toxicity is astounding, really.

    Liked by 2 people

  18. Book twitter is so toxic honestly lol. I’m tired of people acting all high and mighty like *I* am the definitive authority on this book and I have the right opinion and you should all listen to me and it’s like… why. especially since I spend time on YA book twitter which is dominated by not teens and people get shocked and it’s like… you do realize a lot of the teens who these books are for aren’t on twitter right they’re off reading the books?

    like I remember everyone was so shocked and annoyed that Five Feet Apart was on the NYT list for so long everyone was like who is reading this book nobody is reading this book it doesn’t deserve to be on the list!!! and I’m like…. ooookay listen I’m a literal teenager and I know people in my high school are reading this book (for cole spouse lmao right) so just because they’re not getting into drama on twitter doesn’t mean the book isn’t being read and enjoyed so stop. same with everyone getting mad that Mackenzi Lee is writing another Marvel book after book twitter cancelled her. like yeah, I agree she’s pretty shady and I wouldn’t defend her or support her actions, but also I’m not under any delusions that the average high schooler knows anything about book twitter drama. meanwhile, I do know that most high schoolers enjoy marvel movies so… why is anyone surprised?

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Haha I agree with you!! I find some people on twitter to honestly be very dictatorial about what people should/should not be reading tbh. Ah yes I agree with you!

      Haha that makes *a lot* of sense. ahh yes, that’s a great point as well- cancelled on twitter doesn’t mean actually cancelled in real life (and it shouldn’t mean cancellation in real life, because book twitter shouldn’t have that much power). And yeah I agree with you as well- I didn’t like what she did, but lots of people don’t know about it (and also it’s not upto me if other people decide to read her books after that as well).

      Like

  19. Twitter is so toxic! I had to delete it back in June during BLM (with the Husband being a white African we had some different opinions, which were Not allowed). Now I only use it for Readathons. But even then when I happen to scroll through my feed its just ‘lovely middle-grade authors boosting each other’ and ‘negative stuff’. Maybe I follow the wrong people, but there is a Lot of negativity on there….

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Ah yes it really is. Yeah I can imagine- it’s not the place for a broad range of opinions. Ah yes I agree with you. I think that even if you follow people that you don’t act like that, I unfortunately find that I see a lot of negativity in the periphery (ie people I don’t follow but other people have liked).

      Liked by 1 person

  20. Excellent post, which will no doubt get you “cancelled” by the sanctimonious cretins of the Twitter Mob. I’ve never liked Twitter, but 2020 has really opened my eyes to the reality that the platform is a toxic cesspool, infested with mentally deficient attention whores, competing with each other to see who can win the most faux woke brownie points (at other peoples’ expense), just so they can feel powerful.

    I finally had enough of all the fuckery in September, and made the long overdue decision to abandon my Twitter account. It’s been the best decision I’ve made this year, nipping my Twitter-induced depression in the bud, and greatly improving my mental state. I’m just glad that Twitter isn’t, in any way, representative of the real world (not that I was ever stupid enough to believe that it is).

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Thank you! Haha I would be… if they had any idea who I was 😉 Yes same. I think it’s a really horrible platform that unfortunately gives people that only want to tear down others *far too much* power.

      I think that’s a good call tbh. I think that it can have a very negative impact on mental health and have toyed with deleting it loads (I’ve compromised by barely using it). Ah yes I agree with you!

      Liked by 1 person

  21. I have Twitter account but I don’t stay there to engage with readers. It’s secondary platform to share blog posts both mine and others to drive audience to blog. I don’t know how much that helps but it sure help in connecting with authors and publishers. I never know what heated conversations are ever going on on Twitter, I got to know about Rowling controversies though blog posts. You can guess from that how much presence I have on Twitter.

    Liked by 4 people

  22. Terrific post. I find Twitter depressing and toxic — I’ll refer to it sometimes when I see a particular tweet highlighted elsewhere, but I find the spiralling accusations and negativity really negative and just not good for my sense of well-being! And the whole cancel culture thing makes me batty. I mean, if someone does something atrocious, sure, but it also appears that people on Twitter are hungry for even the slightest reason to go after someone. I prefer to stay away.

    Liked by 3 people

  23. I go on Twitter fairly regularly, but mostly just outright ignore the book Twitter drama. It’s often so blown out of proportion, and rarely any of the people shouting are actually ones I follow, and I hate that we bow to their loudness so often. They really don’t represent even a middle-sized portion of readers, but they get treated like the end all be all of books, and it’s just ridiculous.

    Liked by 2 people

  24. I’m biased because I love Twitter and it is my favorite social media platform, but I agree that Book Twitter doesn’t represent that general reading community – it represents the most vocal & passionate subset. Made up largely of bookish influencers, many of whom are critical readers and pick up on things which the average reader doesn’t.

    This could largely be a result of the sheer volume of books read: in 2018, Bustle reported the typical mean average of books read is 12 per year, and the typical American reads 4 books annually. I know I’ve become more critical of books the more that I read, which for me averages to 6.25x the American average (and 18.75x the mean). I think we become more nuanced readers the more we read.

    Another factor is certainly has to be that the large vocal majority on Twitter (based on my experience) are interested in social issues. Blending that with book Twitter, you have a large subset of users pushing for diversity, noticing problematic things in books, and talking about that. As a white person who is always striving to be a better ally, I find it especially useful when things like casual racism is pointed out in books (Like Novik’s most recent book). So much about becoming antiracist is unlearning all of the ways these little things come from harmful stereotypes.

    I think it is useful dialog. That being said, a vocal minority is still a minority. Publishers should certainly listen to and consider feedback given, especially since I think Book Twitter is made up of some of the biggest consumers. Changes won’t happen without discourse though, and the rabid way in which a lot of the discussion takes place isn’t really conducive to learning dialog. There’s a lot to be improved in that arena, and cancel culture goes too far a lot of the times without all of the information in my opinion.

    Thanks for this thought-provoking and brave post!

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Ah that’s fair! And it’s really great to get your perspective!

      I think that’s an interesting point. Thanks for sharing the bustle post! I do agree that people that use social media or blogging platforms are possibly the most avid readers, because there’s definitely an encouraging aspect of being online to get you to read more. I will say that I’m not sure that they all congregate on book twitter though (I’d say that the vast majority are on booktube and blogs- actually probably booktube if I’m not being biased in favour of my own personal favourite 😉)

      And that is a good point. I do definitely see a crossover between the bookish community on twitter being the most vocal politically. And I think to be perfectly honest that’s why I’m not crazy on it- I follow a lot of news elsewhere and don’t especially like politics mixing with my entertainment/hobbies.

      And that’s very fair. Personally I would prefer that publishers take the opinions with a grain of salt (not ignore them, just don’t treat them as gospel). And I agree with you there.

      Thank you so much! And a big thank you for your thoughtful and considered response! ❤

      Like

  25. I love Book Twitter but I steer away from any drama. I think its pretty much like anything. If you find your space amongst nice people then its a community. I’ve heard similar about bookstagram and its exactly the same. Very interesting post though x

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Ah yes I think that’s the only way to enjoy it and there are definitely nice people on there. Ah I didn’t know that about bookstagram- because I’m barely on there and never see any drama- that’s very interesting! Thank you! x

      Like

  26. Love this! Thought what you had to say was awesome. I’ve never been a massive user of Twitter but yeah, I’m less and less inclined to go on it (and am thinking of deleting my account!) because people just seem so nasty most of the time there and over dramatic XD

    Liked by 3 people

  27. Book Twitter scares me!! It’s one of the reasons I fell out of love with blogging (and to a certain extent reading) for a while and got into a big old slump. So much negativity takes the fun out of something which is supposed to be fun!! The worst part I think is seeing other bloggers/booktubers being cancelled for having an opinion that somebody else doesn’t like. Dislike a book, by all means, but when personal attacks are launched at reviewers and loads of people pile on them, it only makes me think badly of those doing the attacking. Great post!! xxx

    Liked by 3 people

  28. Twitter is a thing of evil most of the time and I constantly question why I even bother with it… Masochistic curiosity probably! I’m very good at muting, blocking and unfolllowing those who get on my nerves but it doesn’t seem like enough to cut the crap out the feed most days. *sigh*

    I despise a twitter mob and pretty much ignore everything relating to cancelling a book or author because I’ll make up my own mind. I do not think the shouty book twitters accurately reflect the book community at large, they just represent a very noisy minority and I wish publishers were better at ignoring it.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. haha I completely agree with you! Doing this post has made me wonder… why am I still on there?! I think it’s just to know what other people are saying, even if I don’t enjoy it. Ah yes I agree with you.

      And yes same. Yes absolutely agree!

      Like

  29. I never like social media to begin with. I don’t feel like you can actually talk to people on most of the internet. Blogging is a little tamer. Twitter is a bunch of people that let their feelings get the best of them and winning about how one person’s tweet is causing “harm”. Words are not harmful unless you allow yourself to be scared of them.
    I came across an author who openly admitted she bullies other authors on Twitter and get their books cancel. Twitter is like school there always that one bully instead it a whole bunch of them.

    Liked by 1 person

  30. I’ll be completely honest, I do have twitter but I’m not an avid user of the app because I do find it to be a toxic and energy draining environment no matter the fandom. Book twitter is pretty toxic in itself, if everyone has cancelled an author for something they’ve said no matter matter how long ago, you are expected to burn their books and if you still own them and read from the author you’ll be shamed. I don’t personally follow the crowd in that sense.

    Liked by 3 people

  31. I don’t really use Twitter because of this. I find it quite toxic. I don’t think it’s representative of the general public at all, reading and otherwise. It tends to be a shouting space for those with loud opinions.

    Liked by 1 person

  32. Ooof I totally agree with this. It’s such a microcosm of the general public imo and people get so HEATED. I have discovered lots of good books BUT man, it’s so toxic. I’m on twitter but I do not often engage because it’s so public and I don’t want to be associated with it 😂

    Liked by 2 people

  33. If I remember my Twitter lore correctly, Twitter was initially enjoyed by celebrities as a micro-blogging platform. I believe I heard of it after a buzz piece on Entertainment Tonight many years ago and it does maintain its peculiar statuses as elite, toxic, effective for cancelling and quicker way to disseminate bits of info.

    Liked by 1 person

  34. I love Twitter but scroll past all the drama. I haven’t experienced any personal toxicity and the accounts I follow are lovely bookish peeps. I use it to publicise my blog posts and only take part in discussion threads rarely.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. oh yeah I think that’s the only way to do it. I don’t think I personally follow people that do this- but I think I end up seeing a lot of it in the periphery (something other people have liked for instance). Yeah I completely get that.

      Liked by 1 person

  35. Love this post! I actually didn’t know in the beginning about the number difference and that twitter represents very few people. I learnt that over time when I saw how things that were VERY popular on twitter were barely known otherwise, and popular sentiments from twitter do not show anything about the reality (talking about: any election). Your thoughts needed to be said, and people need to know that while twitter seems like a lot, it actually isn’t much.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you! Ahh yes I didn’t either- but I could guess as well from the kind of things that get hundreds of thousands of likes… and aren’t actually popular opinions. (haha yeah that’s a good point about any election- I’ve seen British politicians make that mistake *a lot*). Yeah absolutely.

      Like

  36. This has made me pause and think …
    I’m not a big Twitter user mainly because I find it eats up so much time that I just don’t have. I see some people who seem to comment/post every five minutes and I wonder how the hell they can do that.
    Even if I had the time I don’t have the inclination because too much of my feed consists of people doing whoopee dances because they got a free ARC through the letter box. Honestly, who the hell cares…
    Your comment that “the platform doesn’t exactly lend itself to nuanced conversation” is spot on – I’ve seen people weighing in on comment streams who clearly haven’t thought about the issue or bothered to read the previous comments yet feel its ok to pass judgement.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Ah yes I agree with you- I think it’s such a time consuming thing to get involved in properly and I don’t see how other people manage it. I just don’t have the time between work and everything else!
      Haha I hear you!
      And yes I agree with you there as well.

      Like

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