All the Positives with Negative Reviews

Ahh the topic that will never die. Recently on book twitter (because it’s always on twitter) there was a flaming row debate about how people that write negative end of year posts (ie worst of the year/most disappointing etc) were evil and should burn in hell wrong to do so. So here we are again. Even though I’ve discussed this before (more than once), I feel like there’s still more to say on the topic. Because I would go further than saying “negative reviews aren’t that bad”- I think there’s a lot of positive things to say about them too. 

keep it realNegative reviews make positive reviews more meaningful. The whole point of reviews is to get an honest reaction from a reader- otherwise it’s not a review at all. As Briana from Pages Unbound pointed out in her brilliant post on this topic, sticking to purely positive reviews is just marketing. And, unfortunately for authors, readers justifiably won’t just blindly trust marketing. Books need organic interest to do well; readers need real reactions.

sheepAs a subset of this, a little negativity can lower hype. For me, this is especially useful, as overhyped books intimidate me. I don’t want to be the first person to dislike it and I don’t want to go into a book with expectations that are too high. I don’t fancy being a guinea pig (I’m a monkey) so I actually need someone to try it first and say something a bit more balanced before I can read it (come to think of it I’m more like a sheep 😉)

throw booksAlso, negative reviews rarely put people off. I for one can only think of a single time that a negative review put me off a book (over a very specific taboo subject). Frankly, the only guaranteed way to make sure I don’t read your book is having a hissy fit about negative reviews (and a good way to get me to support the reviewer in question).

merlin books sharingOn the flipside, negative reviews can make me add it to my TBR- even if it’s something I’ve never heard of before. Readers are smart enough to know that reviews are subjective and discern whether they want to read it on their own. For instance, one of my biggest pet peeves is the insertion of unnecessary politics into entertainment- some readers agree with me, others don’t. Amazingly, because people have minds of their own and can think for themselves (*gasp*) I get plenty of people commenting on negative reviews telling me they plan to read the offending book anyway 😉 (even more amazingly, I don’t stop them! 😉) It’s almost as if people have freewill 😉 And I hate to break it to any author that doesn’t know: not everyone is going to love your book! Reviews aren’t just for readers, they’re for finding the *right* readers.

therapy luciferLet’s be real though- negativity isn’t always about people that haven’t read the book. No, it’s also therapeutic for readers to bond over books they didn’t like. I don’t know about you, but I’m more often drawn to negative reviews for books I didn’t love. I fully admit this is playing into my confirmation bias- but I find it helps me clarify my own thoughts and realising *I’m not the only one* helps me feel sane!

hoarding booksNow, as hard as it may be, I do also try to read negative reviews for the books I love, because I’m all about (attempts at) objectivity for favourites. For me, this is a healthy way of developing a well-rounded response to a book. Sure, I’m unlikely to agree with all the criticisms (because when it comes to arguments around books, feelings come first). Nonetheless, I find it helpful to get different perspectives 1) because it makes me a better reviewer, so I can warn readers off things they may not like (which could be as simple as a statement of fact, like “it’s slow” or “it has flowery writing) and 2) because it gives me the opportunity to strengthen my argument in favour of a book 😉 Because ultimately, that’s what this is all about… even negative reviews act as a ploy to get people to read MORE BOOKS 😉

So, what do you think? Do negative reviews have a place in reviewing? Do you see the positive side to negativity? Or do you see this debate differently? Let me know in the comments!

81 thoughts on “All the Positives with Negative Reviews

  1. YES! I have no idea why this debate keeps coming up! Perhaps because there is this weird blurred line where bloggers are NOT actually marketers, yet publishing relies heavily on bloggers’ and other influencers’ completely unpaid work to market their books. And some bloggers buy into this, either because they truly see their role as “supporting authors” (rather than simply discussing books) or because you seem to need a pretty marketing-heavy presence to get ARCs. Like, I have pretty high stats, but no one will send me print ARCs, and I wonder if it’s because I don’t do marketing-style tweets like counting down to book birthdays and celebrating book birthdays and telling everyone to read a certain book every 5 days? (I have no idea; it’s just a theory I’m playing with.)

    Liked by 6 people

    1. I know- I don’t get why it keeps coming up either! Ah yes I do see that. Haha yes, I think that’s a big part of it. And I get it- people in marketing aren’t going to be very interested in sending books to people that aren’t going to hype it (and I have seen plenty of booktubers/authortubers saying this is why you shouldn’t do negative reviews. HOWEVER the downside of that is reading books you don’t want to read and be regarded as inauthentic… Which means it’s not that simple!)

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Yes, yes they do have a place. I did a disappointing reads post, I’m sure people will have disagreed with me, that’s fine. They just didn’t work for me, I’m entitled to an opinion just like anyone else and we aren’t all meant to agree on things, the world would be pretty dull if we did 😂

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  3. I absolutely agree with you on the point that negative reviews temper expectations. There’s nothing worse than coming into a book overhyped and coming out at the other end disappointed, after all. I also agree about people bonding over hated books. My book club’s discussions are also more lively when everyone hated the book than when everyone loved it!

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  4. I saw the outbreak of that and was truly surprised but then it’s Twitter. I swear there’s like a twitter wheel somewhere that spins every couple of days and whatever it lands on that’s what people are going to be asses about until it spins again.

    Anyway I agree with you about negative reviews. I appreciate them most for those overhyped, over marketed books to cut through the crap!

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  5. I agree with your take; I don’t have a problem with negative reviews, but I don’t think I’ve ever posted a “mean review” on my blog because generally the only books I feel like putting in the effort to review are 4-5 stars. I have started writing mini-reviews on Goodreads for all books, though, and I find other people’s negative reviews interesting to read. I think it’s important to keep a balance of pros and cons in reviews.

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  6. Yep– Im all heartedly agreeing with you here!
    While we always love bonding and screaming about how favorite books, same can be told with hating on books too!! I, for one, really love a good ranting session .. 😂

    I’ve also personally seen a “bad” review for a book make it even more appealing for me to read; as everything that the blogger had pointed out where things that I personally loved. We must not forget that we don’t have the same tastes in books or in tropes aswell. One reader’s trash may be just another reader’s treasure! 😉

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    1. Haha yes for sure!!

      Ah yes same!! And it can also be that I just know I don’t share a reader’s taste for certain things/authors. It’s pretty easy to consider these things when seeing negative opinions and I think people can give other readers more credit when it comes to this sort of thing! Haha yes!!

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Great discussion! I’m so with you, I enjoy a good negative review. I find it funny when authors think there shouldn’t be negative reviews because then it’ll mean that everyone will hate their work… and as you mentioned, not everyone likes the same thing… don’t authors realize this? Even when I dislike a book, I still try to talk about the things that worked for me in my review so it doesn’t sound ALL bad, you know?
    I also like to read negative reviews of books I’ve loved to see what others didn’t like – I agree it gives me a more rounded thought on the book! 😊

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  8. Whether a review is seen as a negative one or not, I think the key issue is if it is constructive. Many negative reviews point out why it didn’t work out for the reader (which is subjective) so I don’t really view the review as a negative one, just mearly a critical discussion… everything has a good and bad side, what works for the reader and what doesn’t. Reviews are a reflection of that and get people talking about a book. Blasting negative reviews is bullying in a form because others don’t think like you. The world would be a boring place if were all thought the same. Be open to new ideas, different opinions, show some maturity, and love the diversity of experiences this world has to offer.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. I really think people over-estimate the power of a negative review. If I give a book one star, only a small number of people will even read the review. Of the people who do, only a portion were probably interested in the book in the first place. Of that portion, only another small portion will likely be swayed not to read the book.

    When I see a negative review of a book I meant to read, I note it, but I usually still read the book anyway because I recognize that I have my own reading tastes and I might not agree with the negative review. I want to find out for myself. I have to see a large number of negative reviews before I actively decide not to read a book based solely on reviews. In this case, I would argue the reviews are simply doing their function–informing me, the consumer, that I don’t want to waste my time/money on that particular read.

    I’ll say it again. Reviews are for readers, not authors. Reviewers are not obligated to post only positive reviews or to pretend that they think a book is better than it is because they feel bad for the author. That’s not how reviews work. Imagine if we had this attitude about everything. What if I went to buy something online, like a new blender, and all the reviews are raving about the blender and the hard work of the people who made the blender and whose livelihoods depend on the sales of the blender. And then I get the blender and it’s poorly made and lasts one day. Would I feel grateful that the reviewers wanted to protect the blender makers instead of me, the one purchasing the poorly made blender? Of course not. Reviews aren’t supposed to make the creators of a product feel good. They are supposed to critically assess the product and let consumers make an informed choice. If we give up negative reviews, reviews become useless and we might as well stop writing them.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Ah yes! The irony of this controversy is that a lot more people then saw all the negative opinions BECAUSE the author tried to shut them up! It’s so counter intuitive to draw attention to negative reviews!

      Yes same! I can only think of a single time that I was put off (and that’s cos the author included a taboo romance that would have made me give it a low rating of I had read it!) And I think it’s amazing how often the people complaining underestimate how readers are capable of *thinking for themselves*! And yes for sure.

      Yes absolutely! And yes- reviewers are of course entitled not to post their negative opinions- but this is a personal choice and it’s part of the gig to speak honestly about books! Hahaha yes!! Absolutely agree!

      Liked by 1 person

  10. I think negative reviews are important as well!! All people have different opinions so I think it’s good to have a range of opinions to look at to decide whether to read a book. I have already added books to my TBR based on negative reviews!

    Liked by 2 people

  11. I recall noting a bunch of negative reviews about a book I found very intriguing. When I read them, I discovered that all the readers shared the same bias. They all came from the view that their sanctuary had been breached by the book’s perspective. I disagree but respect their rights to their opinions.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Oh yes I’ve come across this kind of review before. And I think I (and most other readers) are pretty good at telling when it’s someone else’s bias getting in the way (for instance, I just saw a negative review of a book I hadn’t heard of, where the reviewer said she just didn’t like unhappy books- and that’s fine! Doesn’t discourage me from the book at all! If anything, she’s done the book a favour, since it wasn’t on my radar before!)

      Liked by 2 people

  12. It drives me batty when people refuse to think for themselves or assume that other people can’t. Also, there isn’t a “right” way to review. If people only review books they loved, great. If people do rant reviews regularly, fantastic. I will also say that sometimes I am looking at negative reviews to see if I’m the only one who thought something about a book. Like The Hating Game by Sally Thorne. Didn’t like it, thought I was the only one.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Ah yes same!! And yes absolutely agree!! Oh yes same- sometimes I read a book and just feel so strongly about it that I have to find other people that felt the same way! (and I know that loads of other readers feel the same way, because lots of people on the blogosphere talk about this phenomenon!)

      Liked by 1 person

  13. Thank you for this post! As always, you’ve so eloquently put into words with what I’ve been struggling to figure out how to say. Personally, I don’t read all those end of year posts because I just don’t enjoy them, but I do think they have their place, and to say that someone is evil for not liking a book is just–so much more than can be contained in a comment. Having opinions about books is literally the whole reason we’re here doing this blogging thing, and to expect everyone to like everything is just foolish and ignorant. Negative reviews are important, just as positive ones are, and if someone wants to make a list of their most disappointing books of the year, readers have two choices–read it or not. If you don’t think you’ll enjoy the post, like me, just don’t read it! But for those who do, maybe you’ll have books in common, and that feels very validating, so it might end up being pretty therapeutic.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Oh thank you for your lovely comment! That’s totally fair!! Ahh yes! And yes for sure- I know that’s why I got into this in the first place- I wanted to share my unfiltered thoughts about books… So it would kinda defeat the object if I didn’t do that. Yes absolutely!!

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  14. Oh, totally agree. I do write negative reviews, though not as often as the positive ones – writing a good negative review (i.e. constructive, balanced, thought-through) requires a lot of time and effort and, sorry-not-sorry, not all bad books deserve it 😜. But without the negative reviews we’d indeed be faced with an unending form of marketing and nothing more. We can’t go on pretending that every new book is a masterpiece for the ages! 😉

    Liked by 3 people

  15. I can understand those who say they don’t write a review unless they can give three stars or more but how, then, do we know if that four star average is because few have read it, or because all those who didn’t like it kept shtum?
    A review with stated reasons for the low rating can help a potential reader to evaluate whether those reasons will apply to her reading of the book. (Not to mention helping the author to write a better one next time.)
    I’ve begun a number of worthy books with glowing references that have bored me into putting them aside for ‘some other time’ (maybe if I’m hospitalised with nothing better to do?)

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Yes I can understand it too- I just assume they’re keeping it shtum (/if they say they only rate 3-5, I also will just then consider 3* to be bad, 4* average and 5* good… Which is basically the same anyway 😉) yes absolutely. hahaha!!

      Liked by 1 person

  16. I love reading your posts, I find you a safe harbour in a sometimes overtly stormy sea of drama. Not much I could add to your thoughts here. I think there’s a difference between a reader not enjoying a book and writing about why with constructive criticisms and a reader just slamming a book. Any intelligent person and tell the difference and ignore the child having a tantrum in the playground saying, in effect, “you stink”.

    Liked by 3 people

  17. I think the debate I saw wasn’t about the value of negative reviews as such, but about compiling them into a worst books of the year summary. But there are so many arguments on there anyway, I don’t like to spend much time on there any more 😀

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  18. I genuinely see both sides of this topic. For example, the BookRiot podcasts generally avoid mentioning that they didn’t like a book, and instead talk about books they loved to promote them, which I think is great. They know that everyone has their own opinions, and don’t want to turn someone away from a book they might like just because the host didn’t like it. I also prefer to be more positive on my blog, avoiding “books I hated” posts because I just don’t like being negative. BUT, I think that posting and reading negative reviews is really important. If a reviewer and I often post negative reviews of the same books, I know we have similar tastes, and a negative review from them might indicate to me that I’m not going to like a book. Which, therefore, I want to avoid, because who wants to waste their time reading a book they aren’t going to love? Another example, one of my all-time favorite books is The Goblin Emperor, but when my husband expressed an interest in reading it (since I loved it so much) I tried fervently to talk him out of it because I knew it wasn’t a book *he* would like. Sure enough, he hated it, only read like three chapters. 😦 Everyone likes different things, and that’s okay, so it should be okay to say when we don’t like something. That’s what community is all about.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Yeah I get the book riot approach- I think it’s completely fair for reviewers to choose not to review negatively! And I completely understand reviewers who want to stick to being positive! It doesn’t put me off reviews (especially as I like to see reviewers as individuals and get to know their style/personality a bit, which will give me different expectations for their reviews). And yes same. Ah yes! I get that as well! I have that sort of thing all the time!! Both irl and online- if I know someone won’t like it, I won’t recommend it (heck, the same thing goes for my own writing! I’m not deluded enough to think everyone will like it 😉) yes absolutely!!

      Liked by 1 person

  19. I think negative reviews are important, though I admit that I don’t write many of them because I just DNF books that I don’t like. Your point on 100% positive reviews being marketing is spot-on, especially for smaller books. If there are only, say 5 reviews and all are five stars, I’m more likely to think that this was by friends of the author (vs if there was a 2 or 3 star in there).

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  20. I agree with everything you said and I am glad someone wrote about this issue because as a new blogger I am always conscious about writing a negative review for some of the popular books out there. Sometimes I just want to rant about a book I didn’t like and then I get scared of offending someone who loves that same book. It’s not an easy balance especially for a newbie like me.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Ah yes I understand that! But I have to say (from my v biased perspective) I actually got started reviewing books I didn’t like (cos I didn’t have anywhere to express those opinions) and I found that some people were relieved I’d said it and other people didn’t agree, but were nice about it! ☺️

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  21. Yes, I do mistrust a review that is too gushing. Sounds like an ad, like you said.

    In the case of books I love, when I see people criticize them it can help me to get to know the book better. For example, people have pointed out that the portrayal of Susan in The Last Battle appears sexist. I don’t completely agree, but it did help me notice a certain immaturity in the series’ take on full-grown women, which was actually helpful. It’s like I now notice the series’ limitations, but that doesn’t diminish its virtues.

    On the other hand, sometimes you can tell from a negative review that the reviewer found the whole atmosphere of the book so repulsive that they really couldn’t bring themselves to understand it. These reviews can be interesting for nonfiction books, because sometimes it means the book has attacked a sacred cow. I don’t enjoy this kind of review for fiction.

    As for me, when I start out liking something (book or movie) and it lets me down, I NEED to articulate what happened and why. You know, to process my trauma. 🙂 I don’t necessarily have to share these little postmortems with the world, but I have to do them. It can be a hazard if you happened to watch the movie with me. 😉 And sometimes I am so pleased with myself that I do share them with the world, especially if am hard up for blogging topics.

    Finally, yes, people can definitely bond over media they hate. When humor columnist Dave Barry first started writing about bad songs, he says people would stop him on the street, grab him by the lapels, and yell, “Do know the song [Doot Doot Doot]? I HATE THAT SONG!”

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yes absolutely!

      And yes that’s fair! Sometimes, even if I don’t agree, I get a different perspective on things I loved- and that’s a good thing (even though it won’t diminish my love for it!)

      Oh yes I agree- sometimes my opinion is so different to a reviewers that I’m not going to see eye to eye (but then I just won’t take what they said on board)

      Oh yes- books (/movies etc) that disappoint are the worst! Haha same!! Hahaha I get that! I’m the same! That’s actually how I started reviewing!

      Hahaha that’s hilarious! But it makes sense 🤣

      Like

  22. I love negative reviews! An enthusiastic one makes me add another title to my already too long TBR… a negative review allows me to feel good about not reading a book. I feel there’s too much positivity in the reviews in general, if I’m in doubt whether to pick up a book, I read why people disliked it – I find it to be a great test!

    Writing negative reviews, on the other hand, that is therapeutic. It’s like getting back at the author for the time I could have spent reading sth better! I don’t do that too often, really, but when I do, it’s immensely satisfying 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

  23. Negative reviews are important. Of course, as an author, they can sting but they’re not there for them while at the same time they are. I’ve read some negative reviews on Goodreads to which they sway their followers from not buying it. I guess that’s what some want. When I write a positive or negative review, I never have it in mind for others NOT to buy it. Really, I write the reviews for myself. It helps me as a writer to notice other writer’s strengths and weaknesses; what went wrong with the story or characters or what made it successful for me. I very rarely read an overhyped book when it comes out. I usually wait years later so I can experience it without the noise.

    I think the star ratings are what get me the most. I just don’t get 1-star ratings. Unless a book is so horribly written without a story or realistic characters, I can’t understand how it doesn’t at least get 1-star for ingenuity, research, or a dozen other things and another for your dislike. But then when I read some of the 1-star negative reviews, many never bothered to know the genre (big pet-peeve of mine) or they found something to be appalled about. *sighs*

    I guess it’s the sign of the times. So many people find fault with the littlest of things and really never think about the time, research, and ideas put into books. I know I stand alone here. I’m just griping about people who give beautifully written, skilled, researched books a 1-star rating.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Oh yes I do get what you mean. Unfortunately there are reviewers/influencers who like to stop people reading things and I think that’s unfair (but I also know that there are a lot of readers who dislike the kind of reviewers that want to cancel people). Same! And me too! I’ve learnt that the hard way!

      Haha well you’ve basically explained why I give things one star- I tend to prefer 2 (which I view as, “I didn’t like this, but other people might”). I only have one 1* last year- and it was for a (deliberately) ungrammatical mess, with no story, poor characterisation and was barely comprehensible… But it’s rare a book is like that. I also agree that it’s unfair to give a book 1* for one thing you just didn’t like/they were offended by something- it’s just not a great representation of what the whole book was like.

      No, that’s totally fair. I think that’s a really good flipside to this debate. I think reviewers can easily be guilty of writing bad negative reviews as well

      Liked by 1 person

  24. Like some others have said, it’s interesting that this topic keeps coming up. It’s also interesting that it’s okay for Twitter to help ‘cancel’ a book because of X .. isn’t that just a different form of a negative review?
    I like to read the lower star reviews of book too, helps me to go into a book with more open eyes; it’s also just interesting to read what other readers noticed in a book that others may not have picked up.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Yes, it’s really odd! And that’s true! It basically seems like the same group of people trying to cancel books as cancel reviewers- and it’s just absurd (I also was amused by all the people effing and blinding about how it was wrong to be negative dammit! 😜)
      Me too!

      Liked by 1 person

  25. I found the drama this time even more annoying because it blew up over nothing. The person who did the ‘my worst books of 2020’ didn’t tag anyone or even name anyone in their tweet and the fact quite a few authors tried to say that you shouldn’t negatively review books because 2020 was a bad year was bizarre. Like you, I find negative reviews actually quite helpful. Not just because I can decide whether I can handle certain aspects of the book if I’m forewarned, but also because what someone else doesn’t like could be a trope I love. If I say I don’t like Love-Vs in my review, someone else might read that and think they love that trope and pick the book up. I feel like this subject is like consumerism in Booktube, it keeps coming up over and over again 😀

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  26. I’m getting the sense that people in the comments see reviews as completely negative or positive. A good review should be a mix of positive and negative. When writing reviews I try to balance it out by giving both the negative and positive even if I dislike the book.

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  27. Yes yes yes! I have still read books after reading negative reviews about them, and also negative reviews I think can be really helpful when, let’s say the reviewer is uncomfortable with some content in the book that I also would be uncomfortable reading, and spares me the time of reading a book that could trigger/upset (even though it might not bug someone else). I remember reading a partially negative review for Winter: White and Wicked (I cannot recall for the life of me who wrote it). Mainly the reviewer didn’t like/couldn’t connect with the main character, but as the reviewer described her, I felt like she was exactly like the kind of character I would connect with (and did when I read the book!)

    That being said, people can be cruel and nasty about authors when it comes to negative reviews, but I think that’s a WHOLE different issue than explaining why you weren’t satisfied with a book.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Oh yes I really agree with that- I know I have specific things in books I’m sensitive to, so I try to make that clear in reviews and I know that readers often respond with “I’m going to read it anyway”- which is great! Ah yes I understand that as well! That’s happened to me reading reviews too.

      And yes that’s a very fair point- I think there’s obviously a line between critiquing a book and going after an author. But I also think people are capable of telling the difference between those types of reviews. And I gotta be honest I’ve only ever read/watched those reviews for books I’ve already read (and they’re usually for books I enjoyed as well to see another perspective), because they tend to have spoilers.

      Liked by 1 person

  28. I completely agree. No one can love everything they read, especially not when you review ARCs. I’ve had publisher tell me afterwards I shouldn’t have reviewed the book if I didn’t like it, but hey, you signed up for this as well! I didn’t like it, but many others on Goodreads did! It just means I am not the right crowd for it. I’m just giving out my opinion, JUST LIKE THEY ASKED I DO.

    Also, I think bad reviews give a lot of visibility. I noticed my most seen posts, aside from the hompage etc. are the reviews of books I rated 2 or lower stars. So people know about those books, and then they can choose to do whatever they want with that knowledge!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Oh yes that makes a lot of sense!! There’s no way that if you’re reading lots of ARCs you could possibly like them all! Haha yes!!

      And yes I completely agree- I know that I’ve personally discovered books that way (and also I know that my negative reviews get more hits… although they tend to be for things people already know about- and I’ve had plenty of people tell me they’re going to read it anyway! Which is great! I want to see that sort of thing!) It’s mad that publishers/authors don’t trust readers enough to make the decision for themselves!

      Like

  29. I used to feel bad for wanting to write a bad review and thought i shouldn’t review itif it wasn’t for the best. On the other side i do comment on movies and series i don’t like, so what was the difference?

    Like

  30. Very valuable points. Honestly, it pisses me off that reviewers are criticized for writing negative reviews. It’s their opinions, it’s subjective so everyone should take it with a grain of salt. It’s not possible to love everything we read, there are so many subjective factors that can influence our enjoyment (like our taste in writing style, tropes used, specific character actions that can trigger and/or annoy a specific reader, even our mood while we’re reading it) and that’s ok because it’s our own opinion.
    I totally agree with you, negative reviews rarely put me off unless it refers a specific theme that I can’t handle. And I definitely support reviewers when authors have fits over negative reviews.
    Amazing post.

    Like

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