Quote Challenges – Favourite First Lines: Day 10

Hello all! We’re coming to the end of my favourite first lines edition of the quote challenge- I so hope you’ve enjoyed it as much as I’ve enjoyed making it! As always, here are the rules:

Rules

  • Thank the person who nominated you
  • Post a quote for 3 consecutive days (1 quote for each day)
  • Nominate three new bloggers each day

Thank you so much to the wonderful Sarah @Art Expedition for tagging me! I’ve talked about Sarah on this blog before- BECAUSE SHE’S SO BRILLIANT! Seriously, as you’ll see from her blog, she’s super talented and thoughtful in her posts. I just love her blog and can’t recommend it enough!

book thief first line.png

It’s been a while since I’ve read The Book Thief– because *wow* that book punches you in the gut- but I can’t forget being pulled into the story by this intriguing opening… and slowly realising who the narrator is.

I tag:

Beth, Melting Pots and Other Calamities and Jill Jemmett

Have you read this? Do you love it as much as I do? Let me know in the comments!

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Quote Challenges – Favourite First Lines: Day 9

Hello all! Welcome back to my quote challenge post! In case you haven’t noticed, I’m doing it on a “favourite first lines” theme. And as with a lot of tags, there are rules to break:

Rules

  • Thank the person who nominated you
  • Post a quote for 3 consecutive days (1 quote for each day)
  • Nominate three new bloggers each day

Thank you so much to the lovely Anna @My Bookish Dream! I’m so excited to share Anna’s dreamy blog today (see what I did there 😉 ) I love her fantastic wrap up and reviews- she’s such a great voice on the blogosphere that I know you’ll fall for her style as much as I have! Go check her out!

daughter of smoke and bone first line.png

I’ve talked a lot about classics in these first line posts- but not enough about my other love: fantasy. Laini Taylor is, for me, the pinnacle of what I love about the genre. And this line captures everything, everything I love. It tells you the concept, captures the mood and hints at the lyrical style. Basically, I adore it.

I tag:

Jay, a Novel Glimpse and Bibi’s Book Blog

Have you read the Daughter of Smoke and Bones? Let’s fangirl over it in the comments!

Quote Challenges – Favourite First Lines: Day 8

Hello all! Yup I’m still going with this quote challenge! As always, there have to be rules (to break):

Rules

  • Thank the person who nominated you
  • Post a quote for 3 consecutive days (1 quote for each day)
  • Nominate three new bloggers each day

Thank you so much to the gorgeous Jenna @Bookmark Your Thoughts– she’s such a friendly, outgoing blogger and she’s always sharing the love for other bloggers! She also does fantastic, in-depth reviews and has a great take on tags and memes. You *need* to check her out!

1984 first line.png

This is the kind of first line that I love because it made me do a double take. On first reading, I was like “what’s the big deal… oh wait… wow.” It breaks all the rules- taking you in one direction and then turning everything on its head. Undoubtedly, Orwell’s 1984 is one of the best books ever written- and that opening should tell you why.

I tag:

J W Martin, No Reads Too Great, Lit Lemon Books

Have you read this masterpiece? Let me know in the comments!

Quote Challenges – Favourite First Lines: Day 7

Hello all! Doing another quote today- and I’m particularly excited about today’s pick! Anyway, before we get to that, here are the rules:

Rules

  • Thank the person who nominated you
  • Post a quote for 3 consecutive days (1 quote for each day)
  • Nominate three new bloggers each day

(which I feel even more emboldened to break given I’ll be talking about the ultimate rule breaker)

Thank you so much to the awesome Reading for Sanity Mom– she writes great, thoughtful posts and reviews! It’s always lovely to see what she has to say!

peter pan first line.png

Some people talk about how books have to capture the whole sense of the story in the first line- and what better example than this. Peter Pan is another of my favourite novels- and it’s no wonder it captured my imagination from that first, bold sentence. I think that’s the reason why I spent so much time as a child jumping off my bed, “practising” my flying technique 😉

I tag:

Sprinkle of Dreams, Zezee and Marie

So who else is inspired by this classic children’s story? Let me know in the comments!

Quote Challenges – Favourite First Lines: Day 6

Hello all! I’m still at it with these favourite first line posts 😀 Here are the rules in case you’ve missed them:

Rules

  • Thank the person who nominated you
  • Post a quote for 3 consecutive days (1 quote for each day)
  • Nominate three new bloggers each day

Thanks so much to chomeuse with a chou– her stories about things going on in her life are always super entertaining! If you want to read fun, engaging post, you need to check her out!

shadow of the wind first line.png

Enigmatic, intriguing and inspiring- I frickin adore the opening to Shadow of the Wind (and the rest of the book!) I don’t think there’s anything else to say other than that.

I tag:

Stuck in Fiction, Paper Royalty and Bookishly Rebecca

Who else has taken a trip to the Cemetery of Forgotten books? Let me know in the comments!

Quote Challenges – Favourite First Lines: Day 5

Hello all! Back again for my favourite first line post 😀 As usual, here are the rules I’m breaking:

Rules

  • Thank the person who nominated you
  • Post a quote for 3 consecutive days (1 quote for each day)
  • Nominate three new bloggers each day

Thank you so much to the fantastic Flora the Sweaterist for tagging me to do this! She’s a marvellous bi-lingual blogger, doing book and movie reviews in both English and Hungarian! So worth checking her out!

emma first line.png

There is so much characterisation in this first line!! Although Pride and Prejudice might technically have one of the best lines ever written, I actually prefer this because it was this line that made me understand Austen’s humour and become addicted to her beautiful books.

I tag:

Zoie @Whisked Away By Words, Katie @Never Not Reading and Thinking Moon

Do any of you love Austen? If so, when did you fall for her writing style? Let me know in the comments!

Some Great Reads on the Great War

Hello! Hope you’re having a good Sunday. Now as many of you may know, today marks the centenary for Armistice Day and in honour of the occasion, I thought it would be good to share some books and poems that bring the memory of the war to life. While I am not necessarily well versed in a lot of books on the subject, I do think it’s an important part of history and that honouring the dead is something we can all do with a simple moment of remembrance.

Poets

To start off, I just wanted to share a couple of poems that particularly move me:

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Fiction

The Duration

birdsong

Birdsong– I really love Faulks’ evocative writing style and Birdsong is one of his best works in that regard. Stunningly written, I love how this reflects on the war, managing to reflect on both before and after.

private peaceful

Private Peaceful– I have always loved this moving, beautifully written book. As much as it is a fantastic book for children, I still believe that it’s a profound indictment against the horrors of this particular war.

war horse

War Horse– I’m putting two Morpurgo books on here simply because they’re both such worthwhile reads. And, unique to this list, it’s also written from the perspective of a horse.

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Flambards– This is a really old, but romantic story, spanning the years before and after the war. Why I think it’s great for this list is because it deals with love and loss and the tremendous impact of the war on individuals.

shell house

Shell House– another romance, but with a fairly obvious twist. I do believe this is an interesting and worthwhile take on the war. While I don’t think all the parts of this book totally gel, the reason I’ve included it is because the comparison to modern day and history is rather different. I also think that the best part of this book are the flashbacks and that these parts particularly capture the tragedy of the war.

The Aftermath

blood red snow white

Blood Red, Snow White– while not strictly speaking about the trenches or the war directly, this colourful read follows Arthur Ransome’s journey as a spy as Russia fell to communism. It captures a completely different side to this period in history, focusing on fallout in Russia from WW1 and the ripple effect of that. It’s also written in a fairytale-esque voice, which made it a captivating read from start to finish.

the waste land

The Waste Land– while not strictly speaking about World War I, I think this book is permeated with the shadow of the war. Its vivid descriptions and hidden depths make it a thoroughly worthwhile read.

secret countess

The Secret Countess– I actually mentioned this favourite earlier today when I quoted its opening. Not only does this have the interesting perspective of Russian exiles, one amazing thing about this book was how it deals with the aftermath of the Great War and exists very much in its shadow.

So there you go. What is your favourite World War I poem or book? Let me know in the comments!