I Can’t Keep Quiet About the Silent Patient!

silent patientWhich is why I have to SHOUT FROM THE ROOFTOPS THAT YOU MUST READ THIS BOOK (seriously, it’s really good). Telling the story of a woman who killed her husband and the psychotherapist who can get to the reasons why, The Silent Patient is a book a lot of people have been talking about. And it’s easy to see why.

I picked this up after discovering The Maidens and was quickly drawn into this mystery. The book lends itself to the audiobook format. Michaelides has a brilliant ability to capture different voices, cleverly contrasting the artist’s diary with the doctor’s more clinical notes. I felt like I was inside the psychotherapist’s head, watching with horror as events unfolded.

And once again, the classics references were on point. The myth of Alcestes was artfully incorporated into the plot and used to illustrate difficult themes. It helped to capture the sense of heartbreak and betrayal, exhibiting the realism behind these thrillers. Because these books are better than simply pure entertainment- they have hidden depths. They are filled with pain and truth and snapshots of beauty.

And of course: a fabulous twist (which I won’t be spoiling for you! You’ll just have to read it!!) It was neatly done and boldly executed. I have nothing but good things to say about this book!

Rating: 5/5 bananas

5 bananas

So, have you read this? Do you plan to try it? Let me know in the comments!

The Maidens Had Me in its Thrall!

maidensDo you like twisted thrillers? Do you like books that don’t play it safe? Well then, I have a recommendation for you! The Maidens is dark academia meets mythology meets murder. Something of a marmite book, it seems to have divided some critics for its out-there plot and unusual style. And I have to admit, it’s a little bit mad… but that’s kinda why I liked it.

There was something uncanny that swept me up in the story. The atmosphere seeped through the pages and into my mind. Listening to the audiobook, I felt like I was stepping into a liminal space, teetering on the edge of reality. Written with tremendous skill, it incorporated Greek mythology and literary references without being ham-fisted and by using them to enhance the characterisation. Personally, I loved the use of the Persephone/Demeter myth. Remarkably for a thriller, I was as interested in the powerful portrayal of grief as I was in the ensuing drama.

Deeply entrenched in Greek tragedy, the themes it draws on are no accident. They are woven into the narrative as if by the Fates themselves. From the topic of family to vulnerable women, the dark truth is foreshadowed. And for all that I could see some flaws in the narrative- like some pointless (and obvious) red herrings- I still couldn’t stop reading.

I will admit that in some ways the finale is a little left of field, but I actually liked it for that! While the ending isn’t clearly signposted, with no obvious breadcrumbs or clues, it is clearly mapped out through other narrative hints and subtle cues (highlight for spoiler: I heard someone say that they didn’t think Sebastian was written as a narcissist, but I disagree, as there were moments in her memories where he was being cruel, yet these were cleverly rose tinted because of Marianne’s love and grief). In many ways, the mystery was more meaningful because of just how twisted it was. And that’s why if you’re looking for a thriller that’s a little different, I’d suggest giving this a go.

Rating: 4/5 bananas

4 bananas

So, have you read this? Do you plan to? Let me know in the comments!